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NAILING THE ART OF FRAMING TO BECOME A BETTER COMMUNICATOR

NAILING THE ART OF FRAMING TO BECOME A BETTER COMMUNICATOR

April 17th, 2019 Latest News

Communication: it’s the simple process of gaining and giving information and details.

The thing is though, the way we receive and react to the content of that communication has a huge amount to do with the quality of the ‘frame’ that sits around it.

This means that before you present the price of a property to a real estate buyer, you need to frame the price; before you present the marketing strategy, you need to frame the marketing strategy; and before you present an offer, you need to frame the offer.

You see, framing helps shape the meaning and direction of a particular discussion — it sets the scene and helps solicit your client’s openness to a situation — and so when it comes to positively influencing the people around you, it is perhaps one of the most powerful yet under-utilised tactics in your success toolkit.

Honing and developing your skills in this area will help you become a better negotiator, influencer, dealmaker and communicator, and so here are the three components to framing to get you started!

  1. Pre-frame

A pre-frame provides context and focus for your message and paves the way for it to be well received.

Here are a few examples of some simple pre-frames you can start using immediately in order to improve your communication:

When you meet with your client at a listing appointment, you probably have a number of questions you’d like to ask. Rather than heading straight into question mode and risk being perceived as an interrogator, you could start with, “So that I can give you the best advice possible, do you mind if I ask you a few additional questions?”

See? You have set the scene, the expectation is clear and now the client is ready for you to switch into question mode.

You can also preframe out of a conversation. Here’s another example:

“Besides maximising the sale price, what are you looking for from me as your agent?”

What this pre-frame does is naturally assume that focusing on looking after the vendor’s sale price is a given, while allowing you to tune in and discover other considerations.

  1. Reframe

This is always helpful when you have a concerned or sensitive client.

Objection handling is nothing more than a reframe. You’re reframing the issue to be an advantage — or at least neutralising the issue.A seller might see marketing as a cost, for example. Your goal is to shift — or reframe it — from a cost to an investment in maximising their exposure to the right buyers, which will in turn get the best price in the marketplace.

Another example? Instead of telling a concerned customer they’re wrong, try this instead:

“I totally get your point of view! Perhaps another way of looking at this is…”

And so on.

Another great process for reframing is: “Feel-Felt-Found.”

Feel: “I understand how you feel.”

Felt: “Others have also felt that way.”

Found: “Here is what we have found.”

  1. Where to from here?

Never leave a conversation or meeting with your client without explaining the next step. Always be clear on what the next part of the process is.

“I’ll call you tomorrow.”

“I’ll follow that up.”

“We will be in a position to sign off on this.”

Enjoy the discussion and enjoy putting framing into action in your market place!

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